Crystal Clear: Building LEGO Windows

No matter what kind of building you may be working on, the style of windows is going to say a lot about your creation.  Size and shape will set the tone for the entire building, so it’s extremely important to make sure your window styles don’t clash with the mood you’re trying to create!

Of course, there are dozens of great ways to build windows with LEGO bricks; but today we’ll just look at a few that will hopefully give you the inspiration you need!

One of my favorite ways to build windows is using 2×1 trans-clear bricks.  A hundred or so of these is a worthwhile investment.  They’re by far the easiest way to build large windows.  Your stock of 2×1 bricks can be eked out with a few 2×1 and 1×1 plates.

In this next creation, I just used straight 2×1 bricks.  Very simple, but still elegant!

Ever since I first started using that technique, I had felt like it would be perfect for a church building, so I jumped at the opportunity to use it in the build below!

In the previous build, the windows really have no frames at all, which is okay, because it’s a small building that isn’t mean to capture all the detail of a real church building.  But most of the time frames for your windows are kind of important.  For inside scenes, you can get around the need for a frame with a nice pair of curtains.  For outside windows, here’s a creative frame that I really want to revisit someday!

Turning the bricks sideways can make framing them much easier, as in the example below.

Below, we have two spins off the same basic concept, both using some heavy sidways building.  The bottom window, in particular, is very much not attached, but nevertheless fits snuggly in a 4-stud-wide slot.  With a little experimentation, you can quickly get the feel for how many studs will fit how many sideways bricks.

Shutters are another important thing to consider when building windows.  They’re pretty easy to add and can give your house the realistic flair it was lacking!

As we mentioned earlier, curtains can also make your life easier when it comes to framing windows.  The example below is simple, but does away with the need for a frame altogether!

 

Now let’s move on to some other window styles!  For medieval builds, there’s a very handy window shaped brick with a lattice insert.  This can be used in a variety of ways.  It’s obviously intended to match up with a 1×4 arch brick; but using inverted slopes, larger arches, or even just building it straight into a square gap can work perfectly well!

In the example below, attaching cheese slopes to the top of the window frame and sliding a brick between the slopes makes for an elegant solution to the unusual curve of the arches above, leaving only a few barely noticeable gaps.

Another easy way to do lattice windows is by using the lattice fence brick.  Two of them are the perfect height for a window, and with the addition of a decorative element such as the red circle in the build below, they stick together despite the fact that the top one is upside-down!

For more modern style houses, there are lots of other LEGO windows that can be incorporated into a wall.  Adding a unique frame can give the window a very special effect.

But a fancy frame isn’t always necessary, as this next simple example demonstrates!

 

Another important option to consider when deciding what kind of windows to use in your building is stained glass.  For elaborate buildings such as palaces or cathedrals, stained glass is a great way to add some color and flare.  In the example below, I carefully arranged transparent colored cheese slopes, surrounded them by arches, and stuck the square into the wall.

But not all stained glass windows have to be so painstaking!  The windows below are straightforward, studs-up, but still look elegant!  Notice the use of arches to get out of the need for a frame, too.

In the large stained glass windows below, I used an equally simple pattern.  But while the pattern might be simple, the frame sure wasn’t simple…

 

Not all windows, however, need glass or clear bricks that look like glass.  Especially for castles, slits in the wall work perfectly fine.  Notice particularly the cross slit on the bottom – one of my favorite castle slit techniques and also a very simple one, only requiring a few 1×1 bricks with studs on the front and a couple cheese and double cheese slopes!

Even more modern windows don’t necessarily need plastic as glass; a nice frame can create the illusion for you, as in this optical illusion creation below.

 

One last aspect of windows to consider – windows for micro-scale buildings.  Depending on how small of a scale you’re going with, you can take full advantage of the small slits, holes, and what not that certain bricks have.  For instance, the castle below uses 2×1 bricks with axle holes for t shaped slots, and it takes advantage of the slit on half a hinge brick to create a window-like effect on the far left.

Small trans-clear plates also work well in micro builds, as in the tiny city below.

Even at a larger scale, stacking them can still give the desired effect!

That’s all the window techniques we’ll consider today, but we’ve only scratched the surface of possibilities!  Feel free to share some of your own favorite techniques below.  And if you liked this post, you may also enjoy:

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2 thoughts on “Crystal Clear: Building LEGO Windows

  1. Spyros November 28, 2017 / 6:25 pm

    Great ideas here as always. Definitely worth stocking on some 12 transfer clear bricks after reading his through

    Like

    • Geneva D November 29, 2017 / 8:47 am

      Those things are so useful, building large windows would be a nightmare for me without them!

      Like

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